Category Library School

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Looking Critically at Library Specific Web Tools

Throughout the practicum I am participating in a recurring topic of discussion has been the quality of the tools utilized by many public and academic libraries. These tools are often designed and marketed specifically for libraries, and therefore supported only by libraries and their staff. Many of these programs, subscriptions and softwares mimic other more […]

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Using Qualtrics for Guerrilla Testing

The practicum group used a Qualtrics survey to gather quick feedback on two different interface mock-ups for the EDS project. With an afternoon of planning (mock-up creation and iterative testing of the survey with student participants) followed by 2 hours of guerilla testing in the lobby of Bobst, the team was able to collect over […]

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On Scholarship, or Why I Didn’t Write a Book on Linked Open Data This Past Winter Break

After a semester and a summer of research, 2 months of intense editing (including the entire re-framing of our our short paper), and about 15 LaTeX formatting snafus, I flew to North Carolina with a fellow SILS student to attend and present at my first ever conference. The paper we wrote addressed how linked open […]

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Formulating batch API GET requests with Python

The first step in many linked open data and digital humanities projects is requesting data from institution’s APIs. The documentation for APIs can be extensive (New York Times) or more limited in scope, especially for projects that are not yet complete. While attempting to retrieve data from the new Cooper-Hewitt API for a school project, […]

Yearbook Photo, 1980

Building a Digital Archive

Digital Archives are easier to create than ever before, utilizing content management systems such as Omeka, Drupal, Collective Access or even WordPress, libraries and institutions can share and organize their collections through the web. Digital archives can turn  300 years of chowder recipes into a resource that historians can utilize to analyze regional cuisines, or a media preservation […]

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Introducing: The Illustrated Library

The Illustrated Library: Daily (or somewhat regular) creative commons illustrations of library stuff. Individuals and academic institutions are welcome to use illustrations on (non-commercial) websites and print materials with attribution.

Linked Jazz Postcard

Crafting Linked Open Data for Cultural Heritage: Mapping and Curation Tools for the Linked Jazz Project

I’m proud to announce that the Linked Jazz Project has had a paper published in the Code4Lib Journal! Working as a part of the Linked Jazz Project Team with my peers at Pratt SILS as well as dedicated alumni and our fearless project leader Dr. Cristina Pattuelli has been a major highlight of my time […]

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miNYstory: A Podcasting love affair

How many stories can one block tell? Before there were skyscrapers and yellow taxis, there were a multitude of different New York Cities. Listen-in, above, for a mini-history of the busy corner of 34th Street and 5th Avenue. I’m not sure if I can consider my Reference class from this past semester to truly be […]

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On E-readers … grumble, grumble.

It seems like the final horcrux might just end up being the E-reader. So many of my conversations both inside and outside of the classroom over the past month-and-a-half have related to E-readers either directly or indirectly. In my Information Professions course we’ve been lucky enough to have some really outstanding speakers come and lead our class […]

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Mashups in the library

During my undergraduate I wrote my first ever term paper on mashups of the musical variety (take for example Danger Mouse’s famous ‘Grey Album,’ a mashup of Jay-Z’s ‘Black Album’ and The Beatles’ ‘White Album’). My paper dealt primarily with copyright law, and the line between infringement and fair use – slippery waters to say the […]