Category Library 2.0

Looking Critically at Library Specific Web Tools

Throughout the practicum I am participating in a recurring topic of discussion has been the quality of the tools utilized by many public and academic libraries. These tools are often designed and marketed specifically for libraries, and therefore supported only by libraries and their staff. Many of these programs, subscriptions and softwares mimic other more […]

Using Qualtrics for Guerrilla Testing

The practicum group used a Qualtrics survey to gather quick feedback on two different interface mock-ups for the EDS project. With an afternoon of planning (mock-up creation and iterative testing of the survey with student participants) followed by 2 hours of guerilla testing in the lobby of Bobst, the team was able to collect over […]

honey comb

A Symbiotic Relationship: Information Architecture and the Semantic Web

Linked open data technology and the Semantic Web open up new opportunities for information architects in the connection, management and publishing of information. Information Architects, in turn, can help to make resources published through the Semantic Web more user friendly. Traditionally, locating and querying information within the Semantic Web has been difficult for general web […]

Formulating batch API GET requests with Python

The first step in many linked open data and digital humanities projects is requesting data from institution’s APIs. The documentation for APIs can be extensive (New York Times) or more limited in scope, especially for projects that are not yet complete. While attempting to retrieve data from the new Cooper-Hewitt API for a school project, […]

Live Tweeting from SIGDOC 2013

I am live tweeting talks from SIGDOC 2013. Check in on the proceedings @carolynlimadeo.

Yearbook Photo, 1980

Building a Digital Archive

Digital Archives are easier to create than ever before, utilizing content management systems such as Omeka, Drupal, Collective Access or even WordPress, libraries and institutions can share and organize their collections through the web. Digital archives can turn  300 years of chowder recipes into a resource that historians can utilize to analyze regional cuisines, or a media preservation […]

Introducing: The Illustrated Library

The Illustrated Library: Daily (or somewhat regular) creative commons illustrations of library stuff. Individuals and academic institutions are welcome to use illustrations on (non-commercial) websites and print materials with attribution.

cartoon ipad

iPads in the Library: Pilot Study and Promotion

Rumors of an iPad pilot study for the library began circulating back in October. Two weeks ago — after months of negotiations, careful planning and adjustments — a bank of 20 iPads were delivered to the library.  Cataloged and all dressed up in matching protective cases, the iPads are now available and awaiting the return […]

Making E-Books Visible

The small-to-medium sized undergraduate library I work for has been making the move to e-books. New orders are generally purchased as e-books, older volumes are avoiding the bindery, and lost titles are replaced with e-books. E-books in general, and specifically order-on-demand, have allowed the library’s collection to grow and stretch in new ways: additions to […]

miNYstory: A Podcasting love affair

How many stories can one block tell? Before there were skyscrapers and yellow taxis, there were a multitude of different New York Cities. Listen-in, above, for a mini-history of the busy corner of 34th Street and 5th Avenue. I’m not sure if I can consider my Reference class from this past semester to truly be […]